ProfNet Experts Available on Brain Injury, Sugary Drink Tax, Seafood Benefits, More - WTNZ FOX 43 Knoxville, TN

ProfNet Experts Available on Brain Injury, Sugary Drink Tax, Seafood Benefits, More

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NEW YORK, June 13, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Below are experts from the ProfNet network that are available to discuss timely issues in your coverage area. If you are interested in interviewing any of the experts, please contact them via the contact information at the end of the listing. To receive these updates by email, send a note to profnet@profnet.com with the industries you cover, and we'll add you to the appropriate edition. 

If you are in need of additional experts, you can also submit a query to the hundreds of thousands of experts in our network. You can filter your request by institution type and geographic location to get the most targeted responses. The best part? It's free! Just fill out the query form to get started.

If you have any questions or need assistance with any aspect of ProfNet, please drop us a note at profnet@profnet.com.

 

EXPERT ALERTS

  • Bowling: A Healthy Alternative for Family Entertainment
  • Coping With Brain Injury
  • Can a Tax on Sugary Drinks Decrease Consumer Consumption?
  • FDA to Pregnant Women: Eat More Seafood
  • How Eating Too Little Seafood Harms Pregnant Women and Babies
  • Benefits of Increased Fish Consumption on Children's Growth and Development
  • Updated FDA Advice Recommends Fish for Healthy Brain Development

MEDIA JOBS

  • Editor - Tech Times (NY)
  • Sports Writer - Daily News-Record (VA)
  • Reporter, South Bay Courts - Law360 (CA)

OTHER NEWS & RESOURCES

  • Media 411: Most Memorable TV News Stories
  • How HuffPo Creates Value With Communities
  • Tips for Writing an About Page When You Hate Writing About Yourself

 

EXPERT ALERTS:

Bowling: A Healthy Alternative for Family Entertainment
Tom Winkel
President
South Eastern Michigan Bowling Centers Association
"Bowling can be a fun, and inexpensive, family alternative summertime activity. Everything needed can be rented onsite and there are shoes and balls that are correctly sized for everyone in the family. Bowling doesn't depend on the weather, it uses more than 130 muscles and it even promotes math skills."
Winkel is available to discuss why bowling is a healthy and fun alternative for family entertainment. He is the proprietor of Woodland Lanes in Livonia, MI.
Media Contact: Sue Voyles, sue@logos-communications.com 

Coping With Brain Injury
Diane Roberts Stoler, Ed.D.
Neuropsychologist, Sports Psychologist
Dr. Diane Brain Health
"The methods or treatments that are right for you depend on the nature of your symptoms, your personal health care preferences, and other factors. It is worth noting that no single treatment, whether conventional, complementary, or alternative in nature, relieves every symptom for every personal with PCS. Nor does any particular combination of approaches guarantee a faster recovery from long-term problems with thinking, reasoning, and understanding. However, thorough and proper diagnosis, evaluation, education, a strong will to recover, and the development of a strong support system, combined with restorative sleep, exercise, proper nutrition, and stress reduction are vital components of progress in the months after injury."
Dr. Stoler, Ed.D. is a neuropsychologist, board certified health psychologist, board certified sports psychologist, and trauma therapist with over 35 years of experience. In 1990, she had a stroke while driving her car, resulting in a 60 mph head-on auto accident. She has since undergone brain surgery, and sustained two more concussions. Using her experience and expertise, she wrote "Coping with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury," the first comprehensive guide to brain trauma and its hidden effects. Her newest book "Coping with Concussion and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury" released November 2013 covers all aspects of the recovery process, including information on sports and blast injuries. As both a professional and a survivor, she devotes her clinical practice, writings and personal appearances to helping organizations and individuals overcome life's obstacles and achieve their goals. She is available to discuss concussion, brain Injury, PTSD, brain fitness, brain health, and memory problems.
ProfNet Profile: http://www.profnetconnect.com/diane_stoler
Website: http://www.drdiane.com        
Expert Contact: diane@drdiane.com

Can a Tax on Sugary Drinks Decrease Consumer Consumption?
David Selig
Founder
TrueTaxHelp.com
A study financed by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, which has long advocated taxing sodas and other sugary drinks as part of its efforts to reduce childhood obesity, found that consumption of calories in drinks would drop 9.3 percent if a tax of four-hundredths of a penny for every calorie was added to the price, but fall by just 8.6 percent under a tax of half a cent for each ounce in a can or bottle. Says Selig: "This is utter nonsense and it won't deter people from drinking soda just like other taxes don't deter people from indulging in their favorite forms of vice. Yes obesity is a nationwide epidemic but, it's an individual's choice to be obese and the only way to truly fight it is to educate the public on the benefits of good health choices. Taxes on sugary drinks, fast food and other high fat foods will do nothing to solve this problem."
Selig has appeared on Fox Business, NBC, CBS and other media outlets discussing today's biggest tax and finance stories. He has also appeared on TV to discuss taxes on sugary drinks.
Website: http://www.truetaxhelp.com 
Media Contact: Mark Goldman, mark@goldmanmccormick.com 

FDA to Pregnant Women: Eat More Seafood
Tina Ruggiero, M.S., R.D.
Registered Dietician
National Fisheries Institute
On June 10, 2014, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released draft advice that strongly encourages pregnant and breastfeeding women to eat more fish as part of a healthy diet. The updated draft advice recommends that pregnant and breastfeeding women eat a minimum of eight ounces of seafood weekly; this replaces the prior emphasis on a maximum that discouraged pregnant women and children from eating fish. Scientific studies show that women who eat a variety of fish at least two times each week during pregnancy have babies with enhanced brain development; women who skip fish may be missing out on this benefit. The new draft advice is in line with fish consumption recommendations in the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans as well as advice from the World Health Organization. Says Ruggiero: "The bottom line is that studies have confirmed that the health benefits of eating a variety of seafood significantly outweigh any perceived risk." Ruggiero is available for interviews, and can explain what the new advice would mean for women, their developing babies, and young children. She is an award-winning nutrition expert and author of "The Best Homemade Baby Food on the Planet" and "The Truly Healthy Family Cookbook."
Media Contact: Hannah Hurdle, hhurdle@chandlerchiccocompanies.com

How Eating Too Little Seafood Harms Pregnant Women and Babies
Kirby Tyndall, DABT, Ph.D.
Toxicologist
National Fisheries Institute
On June 10, 2014, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released draft advice that strongly encourages pregnant and breastfeeding women to eat more fish as part of a healthy diet. The updated draft advice recommends that pregnant and breastfeeding women eat a minimum of eight ounces of seafood weekly; this replaces the prior emphasis on a maximum that discouraged pregnant women and children from eating fish. Scientific studies show that women who eat a variety of fish at least two times each week during pregnancy have babies with enhanced brain development; women who skip fish may be missing out on this benefit. The new draft advice is in line with fish consumption recommendations in the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans as well as advice from the World Health Organization. Says Tyndall, "Fish consumption has been studied extensively, and the science shows that eating fish at least twice a week offers a net -- or overall --benefit for moms and babies. The biggest concern is actually that pregnant women are eating too little seafood, which means baby misses out on its powerful health benefits."
Dr. Tyndall is available for interviews, and can speak to what the new advice would mean for women, their developing babies, and young children.
Media Contact: Hannah Hurdle, hhurdle@chandlerchiccocompanies.com

Benefits of Increased Fish Consumption on Children's Growth and Development
Laura Jana, M.D.
Pediatrician
National Fisheries Institute
On June 10, 2014, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released draft advice that strongly encourages pregnant and breastfeeding women to eat more fish as part of a healthy diet. The updated draft advice recommends that pregnant and breastfeeding women eat a minimum of eight ounces of seafood weekly; this replaces the prior emphasis on a maximum that discouraged pregnant women and children from eating fish. Scientific studies show that women who eat a variety of fish at least two times each week during pregnancy have babies with enhanced brain development; women who skip fish may be missing out on this benefit. The new draft advice is in line with fish consumption recommendations in the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans as well as advice from the World Health Organization. Says Dr. Jana: "These recommendations are of particular importance for women of child-bearing age in that they make clear the positive impact that fish consumption has on growth and development, as well as general health. It has been both striking and concerning to me how misunderstood previous fish recommendations have been. A vast majority of pregnant women don't eat anywhere close to the recommended amount of fish per week that we now know provides important health benefits to both mom and baby."
Dr. Jana is available for interviews, and can provide expertise around what the new advice would mean for women, their developing babies, and young children. She is a board-certified pediatrician, health communicator and award-winning author of "Heading Home with Your Newborn" and "Food Fights" (published by the American Academy of Pediatrics).
Media Contact: Hannah Hurdle, hhurdle@chandlerchiccocompanies.com 

Updated FDA Advice Recommends Fish for Healthy Brain Development
Robyn Flipse, M.S., M.A., R.D.
Registered Dietician
National Fisheries Institute
On June 10, 2014, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released draft advice that strongly encourages pregnant and breastfeeding women to eat more fish as part of a healthy diet. The updated draft advice recommends that pregnant and breastfeeding women eat a minimum of eight ounces of seafood weekly; this replaces the prior emphasis on a maximum that discouraged pregnant women and children from eating fish. Scientific studies show that women who eat a variety of fish at least two times each week during pregnancy have babies with enhanced brain development; women who skip fish may be missing out on this benefit. The new draft advice is in line with fish consumption recommendations in the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans as well as advice from the World Health Organization. Says Flipse, "The draft advice reflects the overwhelming evidence that fish provides the required omega-3s for optimal brain and eye development of infants and children. Fish is the single best natural source of omega-3s available to Americans. Per the advice, fish is not merely a part of a healthy diet but a vital staple for the brain development of infants and children."
Flipse is available for interviews, and can explain what the new advice would mean for women, their developing babies, and young children. She is both an author and nutrition expert.
Media Contact: Hannah Hurdle, hhurdle@chandlerchiccocompanies.com

 

MEDIA JOBS:

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OTHER NEWS & RESOURCES:

Following are links to other news and resources we think you might find useful. If you have an item you think other reporters would be interested in and would like us to include in a future alert, please drop us a line at profnetalerts@prnewswire.com

  • MEDIA 411: MOST MEMORABLE TV NEWS STORIES. The dawn of television news in the 1940's brought the ability of national and international stories to enter our homes front and center with images and sound. Since then there have been several events that forever will stay in our minds and will be synonymous with the era of television news. Here are our top ten: http://prn.to/1leoah3
  • HOW HUFFPO CREATES VALUE WITH COMMUNITIES. It is not about what is a community, but more about who is community. Community is about people and having relationships with these people. Huffington's Post Director of Community Tim McDonald discussed how to develop and maintain communities at a recent event hosted by HuffPost Code: http://prn.to/1kdj4G0
  • TIPS FOR WRITING AN ABOUT PAGE WHEN YOU HATE WRITING ABOUT YOURSELF. Does anyone actually enjoy writing about themselves? An entire page about me? That's torture. For bloggers, however, an About page is essential. You can fight it all you want, but you'll eventually need to put fingers to keyboard and tell your story. Here are some tips for getting started: http://prn.to/1iUD6B0    

PROFNET is an exclusive service of PR Newswire. To submit a request for experts: http://bit.ly/findexperts  To search the ProfNet Connect experts database: http://www.profnetconnect.com  To contact ProfNet by phone: +1-800-PROFNET, ext. 1  To share a thought on Expert Alerts: profnetalerts@prnewswire.com

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